• ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
  • ACC Calgary
Welcome, Guest
Please Login    Lost Password?

Tools for route preparation and navigation
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
Go to bottomPage: 1
TOPIC: Tools for route preparation and navigation
#244
Tools for route preparation and navigation 5 Years, 5 Months ago  
Description of navigation for a 300km/15 days Wilderness trip (spring 2012, Canada)

Tools :
At home PC, internet, printer
Backpack
Compass and watch with altimeter/barometer;
Maps, self printed, showing planned route, and grid, in a waterproof pouch, scales 50k and 250k;
Samsung Galaxy Nexus, in a waterproof box, small USB solar charger, spare battery (remained unused);
Oziexplorer CE android, Oruxmap (freeware).

Route preparation
Study of route description in books and websites;
Download of maps from ftp toporama and geogratis, import in Oziexplorer;
Route plotted on Google Earth, with 250 waypoints, saved in *.kml ;
Kml file imported in Oziexplorer desktop, for modification and printing of maps;
Oziexplorer CE, import of toporama maps; and route file.
Oruxmap, download of Google Earth images and VMS toporama maps for offline use, import of kml file.

During the trip
Compass and printed maps used very frequently;
Samsung Galaxy Nexus switched on 1-2 times a day.

Comments
Lot of time spend for preparing route;
No navigation error, sometime uncertainties;
Happily, no foggy weather;
The printed maps were the most useful;
Without A-GPS the GPX fix can take quite long;
Galaxy Nexus difficult to read in bright sun;
Oziexplorer used to display GPS position on topo map;
Oruxmap used for display of Google Earth images.

How do you prepare your trips? For sure there are more modern or practical tools. Lets compare.
Samuel
Fresh Poster
Posts: 1
User Offline Click here to see the profile of this user
Gender: Male Location: Calgary
Last Edit: 2012/12/22 14:35 By 85411.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
 
#252
Re:Tools for route preparation and navigation 5 Years, 5 Months ago  
Interesting topic.

I personally do something very similar.

Field equipment: Garmin Etrex 30 (splash proof with altimeter) & printed maps
Preparation software and databases:
1) NRC provides free digital information for all of canada (ftp2.cits.rncan.gc.ca/pub/). This database includes satellite imagery (CanImage), raster images of all topographic maps (CanMatrix) and the topographic maps in vector format (.shp). Its a little old (1990), but still of good quality.
2) Elevation data can be obtained from GeoBase (geobase.ca/geobase/en/browse.do?produit=...e=50k&map=canada) which will soon have updated road, rail and transmission information.
3) Quantum GIS with GDAL plug-in, free mapping software that is really quite good (hub.qgis.org/projects/quantum-gis/wiki/Download).
4) Google earth is the best free source of satellite imagery (much better than CanImage). Google earth often has <1 m resolution images which is good enough to see back-country huts, trails, cliffs and even crevasses. For example, Jumbo hut is visible in Google earth, and the official coordinate is off by a few hundred meters. A quick check and adjustment and you should be able to find the hut in a blizzard (assuming that you corrected the coordinate and put it in your GPS).

My field prep:
1) Generate a waypoint list of intended route. Use guide books, topo maps and Google Earth to get a list of coordinates spaced 0.5-2 km. I use (sourceforge.net/projects/kmlcsv/) to convert .csv to .kml and vic versa.
2) Convert list of waypoints into a gpx file for my gps (default Garmin software which is not very good).
3) Use quantum to plot waypoints on a topographic map and print map (letter sized) for relevant portion of the topo map. Having labelled waypoints that are both on a hard map and in the gps is really useful and flexible. Maps are best for planning and seeing the overall terrain, gps for navigation and route management (determining ETA is well after dark).
4) I always leave my gps on for the entire trip. After I get home, I usually verify waypoints and correct way-points and maps as needed.

I have tested this method for the last two years, but two trips of note were both 5 days is near white-out conditions. One was the Bonnington traverse; cloudy conditions and heavy trees made tradition navigation tough. The other was a 5 day assent of Snow Dome in mostly white out conditions on glacier (beginning of November). I couldn't imagine doing either without synchronized gps and maps.

I have also used this method to "find" the start of Midnight Rambler. The group ended up 1 km away and and half way up the climb. This is impressive because the approach is less than 2 km and you can see the climb from the road. I learned the hard way that gps navigation is only as good as the waypoint. Many older guidebooks have coordinates with accuracy in the range of 500-1000 m and these waypoints need to be cross referenced with satellite images or topo if they are to used with a gps.

Cheers,
Matthew Breakey
Admin
Posts: 82
User Offline Click here to see the profile of this user
Last Edit: 2012/12/21 19:53 By 66876.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
 
Go to topPage: 1
get the latest posts directly to your desktop